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from outside washington into washington. it depends from city-to-city. boston business leaders are interested in health care. miami, transportation, san diego, international -- an intellectual property -- it varies from city-to-city. in terms of immigration reform, what we have seen as different sectors of the economy look at immigration differently. the high-tech community is looking at bringing in more high-skilled workers or keeping graduates in the united states to help them with challenges in computer sciences, for example, or health sciences. you have the hotel industry and the airline industry focused on trying to make sure that travel visas are administered more efficiently so we can bring in more tourists to spend more money. you have the industry sectors with an interest in immigration. our view is immigration reform will be a big issue in 2013 and you will see big companies across sectors working together, combining shared interests to get something done. host: here is a tweet from one of our viewers -- how does the national debt directly effect businesses, or does i
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
crime cities in the country. but i never hear anything about it. the only thing i hear is every time something happens to a white kid. its national news, it's big news. let's talk about all kids, not just the white kids. host: a tweet -- let's hear more from the commander-in-chief in newtown, connecticut, yesterday addressing the cause of what happened on friday. [video clip] >> these tragedies must end. to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex and that's true. no single law or set of laws can eliminate people from the world or prevent every senseless acts of violence in our society. but that cannot be an excuse for inaction. surely we can do better than this. if there is even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town from the grief that visited tucson and aurora and oak creek and newtown, and communities from t communitieso blacksburg before that, surely we have an obligation to try. host: that was president obama speaking last night. we're asking whether you think u.s. gun laws should change. here's
, neighbors, community members, city leaders, leaders of our country, the mayor, and other special guests. i have the honor of introducing my friend and our champion, secretary of education arne duncan. give him a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
mayor of kansas city, missouri, but he's also an ordained methodist pastor. pastor cleaver is frequently called upon for words to deliver at my whip meeting on thursday mornings. i have said they are the highlight of our week, in many respects. emanuel cleaver speaks to us about humanity, about caring, about respecting each of our colleagues on either side of the aisle, of respecting and honoring our responsibilities to our fellow citizens. in short, emanuel cleaver on a weekly basis appeals to the best that is within us, to reflect the best that is america. emanuel cleaver will shortly be succeeded as president of the c.b.c. by marcia fudge from ohio. like emanuel cleaver, a leader of conscience, a leader of great ability and a leader who will reach out to all of us as well and continue to lead this organization that we know is the conscience of the congress. as we talk about creating jobs, as we talk about caring for one another, as we talk about makinging life better for all americans, there is no more compelling voice than the congressional black caucus towards that end. and there ha
that are not just in your house but are in your neighborhood. your cities. our states, the vibrancy of our country. and we are headed over the fiscal cliff after four years of leadership from this president who is running, running directly to the fiscal cliff. has even said, and secretary of treasury said, we don't mind jumping off this cliff. mr. speaker, we should not be having that kind of attitude. we should have the attitude that we are for everybody. we want to be for american entrepreneurship and especially small business because it's small business, family farms, small business electrical companies, people who put their name on the buildings, creativity. people get up to go to work every day. that's who we are going to hurt. we are not just going to hurt them, we are going to hurt their business families. people who they have had employed, small communities, large communities, but small business which is the engine of our economy. that's really who we are going to punish. lastly, we should not do it at this time just like we should not have two years ago, but i guess we were aiming for an
to the foundation's intent to sue the city for its city seal which contained a cross and a billboard that included elements of that city seal that was in a city park. mr. speaker, this is an outrage. the seal and sign are harming no one. they are widely embringsed by the citizens of bulla kansas. it contains the words values and progressive ideas. unfortunately in this case progressive ideas are making a war on traditional values and it's high time for that to stop. some will claim the first amendment to the constitution requires the cross be removed from this seal and sign. that's hogwash. the first amendment begins with the words congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise thereof. in this instance congress made no law. for that reason alone the first amendment does not apply. furthermore, it cannot be set that this simple seal in any way is an establishment of religion. there is no officially supported secretary or denomination in the manner, this is not in any way an endorsement of any particular religion or any religious denomination. in short the first amendment as originally wr
secretary and odot, we took down 9,000-foot bridge in oklahoma city. and to get rid of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges. so over the next 10 years, we will go from the bottom in the country in terms of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges to the top in terms of creating that infrastructure in our state. and we're literally recycling beams and saving millions of dollars by something that would have just been thrown out under normal circumstances. and it's the only project like that of its kind in the country that we're pretty proud of. the other thing that we're doing, roxanne's governor, governor hickenlooper, tom mentioned before the third bucket of energy. governor fallin and governor hickenlooper created an initiative to convert state fleets to c.n.g. and governor mcdonell as well is supportive. we went to detroit with a group of 13 governors signed on to an m.o.u. and we had -- convert our fleets to c.n.g. and produce a fleet vehicle and give us that ability to do that efficiently. we'll give you the market. we'll put up 5,000 cars that we commit to buying. and
culture of new york for a capital city albany on c-span2 and c-span3. next, president obama likes the national christmas tree. after that, the capital -- capitol christmas tree lighting with john boehner. tomorrow, on washington journal, guests discussed the latest on the so-called fiscal cliff negotiations and the week ahead. a politico reporter looks at the lobbyist involvement in those negotiations. and an update on the situation in syria. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 63, i believe and they are going to say that is president. and indiana -- >> we are talking about facts. when they decided the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish it. they did not say all the states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish peeping >> you are misrepresenting. >> no, i am not. >> i hear these accusations that black people, a voter i.d. lost disproportionately affect minorities. it implies to me that we have something missing in our brains. to me, if white americans can get it to v
and the national association of county and city health officials and trust for america's health. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. does the gentleman from michigan continue to reserve? mr. rogers: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers. so i would just urge passage of the legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan. mr. rogers: thank you, madam speaker. as many things keep me awake at night as the chairman of the house permanent select committee on intelligence, the growing threat from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks not only abroad but here is of growing concern, instability in governments that possess these materials and increasing interest from those who would choose to do harm to the united states, desire to get their hands on these materials, means that we must prepare ourselves here at home for the unfortunate, i t
, established a new amtrak route between chicago, the quad cities, and iowa city. this $230 million project will be completed in 2015 and is creating more than 500 family-wage jobs each year. and that's just the start. mr. boswell has been advocating for high-speed rail or for ethanol pipeline. has always been focused on what is best for iowa and for the transportation needs of this nation. he's been an invaluable resource to our committee. i know we will miss him speaking on the committee, but we certainly will look forward to continuing to profit from his experiences and advice to us in whatever capacity he may follow in his many years left. and i would note that again before i conclude as has already been noted that it is the gentleman from iowa that beat mr. boswell that is bringing this special order to the floor today. i think that is worth special recognition as well because it shows a greatness of both these individuals, how they can fight a very hard battle, political battle, yet both remain true gentlemen. i would even submit that in this day of critical fiscal cliff negotiations,
york, capital city. our producers gathered about programming while they were there. there are traveling to state capital to feature history and literary life as he will see from albany, new york. the two c-span.org/local content. here is a clip. a project funded by the library of congress. [video clip] >> it includes all of the states, every state in the union has at least one talking book library. the design is to be shored that everywhere, this idea of equal access to materials is fulfilled. in new york, the port of entry is your local library. you can go into any public library, you can go up into a school library or academic libraries in new york. if you are printed disabled and you need help to be able to read materials or here or listen to print materials, the library's new connection to us. we make arrangements for people to have improved access. the service is one and that transition from books that used to be recorded pretty much on tape, the old cassette tape idea to using the latest in digital technology. we are excited about the transition because it makes it faster, cheaper
was at the oklahoma city bombing where another american killed scores of people. larry pratt, do you think the shooting yesterday was a game changer? guest: if it results in a ban on guns in schools, that will be the case. that was my opinion when i heard about this tour -- this horrific death toll. we have to get past the idea that we are saved by being disarmed. that is not a plan. host: larry pratt is the executive director of gun owners of america. thank you for being on the program this morning. back to the phones and our discussions regarding the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. our next call comes from eunice in east pittsburgh, pennsylvania. caller: thanks for taking my call. we need more security in our schools. when it comes to guns, we have people who come into lower class neighborhoods giving our young children guns for a few dollars or no dollars whatsoever, just giving guns to our people so they can shoot one another. it does need to stop. if that can be taken care of, that would be helpful as far as our young children. that is all i have to say. i am very sorry about
community outside of chicago that passed a city ordinance or you could not own a gun. that, a small community outside of atlanta passed a city ordinance requiring every household to own a gun. they had an exception for those who had a conscientious objection to owning a gun, but what happened? the crime rate skyrocketed. why? because the criminals knew that the citizens could not protect themselves. the criminals went to places where the criminals could carry out their activities and do their stealing and things without having the danger of someone trying to protect their property or their lives. the crime rate went up markedly in that area. the real solutions -- i am working on solutions. both parties are guilty of spending money we do not have. we have to stop that and we have to start looking at areas of the federal government where we can send those dollars back to the states. my job under the constitution as it was intended was to come into washington making sure we have a strong national defense, making sure our foreign affairs are at the best interest of this country, voting
. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what does that tell you about the magnitude of the issues? guest: it is not like an issue us.'s snuck up on expiring tax cuts, payroll tax cuts is going away. all these things have been out there for a long time. some of this was put off because of the election. they have to get some kind of deal to avert what can be a messy beginning of the new year. host: any deal is likely to be limited. guest: we have heard about the talks between president obama and john boehner. a grand deal that would include some changes to social security, medicare, cuts in defense spending potentially as well. talking $4 trillion -- we are talkin
on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports
about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another. i think the word compromise is over used, underutilized and misunderstood by an awful lot of people. it does not mean throwing in the towel. i have a couple of friends that i've talked to about compromises. in one instance, their idea of a compromise is when i see if there is a way. -- when i see it their way
as mayor in the city of san diego. joe baca has been a strong advocate for california's agricultural industry while in congress. he has worked on behalf of the workers themselves, making sure they received the civil and legal rights they deserved. congresswoman laura richardson has worked hard to keep america safe as a member of the homeland security committee. her constituents are unwavering and she will be missed next year. california is a large state with many needs and priorities, but our delegation is strong. during the time in office, these members have been esteemed colleagues and it's been an honor to work along side of them. their knowledge, passion and commitment to public service will be greatly missed in these halls. and i wish to thank each of them for their service and wish them the best in the next adventure. i yield back. mr. miller: i recognize congresswoman eshoo. ms. eshoo: i want to thank -- did you want to know how much time you had left first? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 29 minutes. mr. miller: we're fine. thank you. you're fine. ms. eshoo: thank
: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community rather than a police organization pulling me over and the time they feel like it. host of this, and comes to us from facebook. a few of our viewers and listeners are listening -- to hang in. host: our next caller is an independent in the vienna. caller: my comment, and it is not probably going to be popular, but my stance is that ever since the schools became drug free, more drugs than ever have been handed out to kids. the principal and the nurse in the school, whether it is packs all, ritalin, whatever. find a school shooting that did not have something to do with a kid raised on these drugs. you cannot find them. i promis
the other side of this case. host: you represent a very urban area? tesco i have nothing outside the city limits of louisville -- calleguest: i have nothing outse the city limits of louisville. as a kid, i went to summer camp and got my certificate of sharpshooting. i always thought guns or something the good guys used to ward off the bad guys bending most frequently, guns are used -- when they are in society, they are used by bad guys. i have always been afraid of them. i live in a community where there are more people who are afraid of them because they have direct contact with them on an almost daily basis. that fear i think gives me a right to be free to go to a grocery, theater, or a mall without having to carry a gun to protect myself. host: if you were in a different district in kentucky, with your position be a political death wish in a sense? guest: there is a good chance it would be. my colleague who lost this year represented the lexington area and always felt without a rating from the nra, he could not survive. he fel ttha tway and i suspect many of the other districts in kent
i brought with me. i was an executive at an electronics company and on the city council and here. i just, you know, it was not like i did it why can't you? i did it because i had a lot of advantages. >> is there a dichotomy with your younger life and being in the wealthiest district in america? >> in my younger life, i was the daughter of a veterinary ran. i was fine, it is a long story, i'm not going there. yes, living in the wealthiest district and running if congress as a welfare mom, but i wasn't running as a welfare mom, that was my story of who i was. i was also an executive at an electronics company. i had my own business. i was a real activist in my community, people knew me. it just added something, somehow. so then i got here and my staff and my consultants started cautioning me not to be the one that comes down to the floor and keeps talking about my welfare experience. i wouldn't do that. most issues but on the welfare reform under bill clinton. i didn't totally agree with what he was doing and i was the co chair here at the house. i thought that was pretty good, it was
in congress, but i know he'll make a mark as mayor in the city of san diego. joe baca has been a strong advocate for california's agricultural industry while in congress. he has worked on behalf of the workers themselves, making sure they received the civil and legal rights they deserved. congresswoman laura richardson has worked hard to keep america safe as a member of the homeland security committee. her constituents are unwavering and she will be missed next year. california is a large state with many needs and priorities, but our delegation is strong. during the time in office, these members have been esteemed colleagues and it's been an honor to work along side of them. their knowledge, passion and commitment to public service will be greatly missed in these halls. and i wish to thank each of them for their service and wish them the best in the next adventure. i yield back. mr. miller: i recognize congresswoman eshoo. ms. eshoo: i want to thank -- did you want to know how much time you had left first? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 29 minutes. mr. miller: we're fine. th
, the citizens from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states. president william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, u.s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's ohio electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution federal law and ohio law all recalled this group as individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio college of electoral, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, n hustend.john jews d -- husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of its. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the
to reclaim land in that city that was pushed aside by saddam hussein when he was dictator. there is a problem with the rise of al qaeda in iraq and bank at the same time, iraq has not pulled over like they did in 2005. i think that is in part because all major parties are not prepared to go to the brink like that and i think there is some hope that over time the u.s. engagement with the iraqi military can be a positive thing. you can see if things -break the right way with iraq, you see a relationship with the army that would be much different than the u.s. relationship with the egyptian military, that you would really find a more mature relationship. host: our guest is a senior national security correspondent. from minnesota on our republican line, go ahead. color code do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to -- caller: do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to come to a head pretty soon? do you think we should put pressure on israel to get rid of their nuclear weapons? if we really want peace over there, shouldn't we want everyone in that region do not hav
. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs to motivate people to go to work. host: what would you like to see done? caller: i would like to see that the welfare and section 8 programs and these programs out there, that they tell the people you go to work and we will subsidize -- we will give you a small check to help you support your little family. a lot of these people on these programs are not married. they are single parents. my friends in the military ar
: and that the wall street journal, their front page -- back to the telethons, panama city on the line for republicans. go ahead. caller: yes, good morning. i just wanted to say, we should be able to vote to congress out on no-confidence. we should have been no confidence bill to get them all out. >host: do you think that would work? caller: it would be better than what we have now. look at what it costs us per day. we are in a gridlock. it is causing tax payers millions of dollars. let's vote about and start over. host: what makes you think if they brought in 535 new people that the situation would be better than it is right now? caller: it would not be better than it is right now, but it would be better a in the future. it would get to a better place. i think the fear of a no- confidence vote might stir somebody -- it might get people working a little bit more aggressively. host: as we continue the discussion on the senate negotiating a fiscal of deal, we want to look at other items this morning. this is from "the new york times." mike on the line for independents. your thoughts on that the senate n
and started to help the rebels, which at that time were just rebels, no control of any city. he stayed in a hotel and worked to court made international support for the rebels. he was not even the massacre at the time. after the rebels won the war, he said of this compound as a temporary facility, which the report is critical of. it was a failure and a precursor to this incident, the fact that this mission was deemed a temporary facility which allow the state department to neglect security requirements that would have been put in place had been declared an official consulate. that is a huge part of the story. ambassador stevens believed that because he had been such a good friend of the libyan people, especially in benghazi, as they were struggling, that he had a relative amount of safety. he is often described as a man that would eat at local restaurants, he would meet people wherever they were. it is not totally clear why he was in benghazi that night but he did have a light security contingent, which was part of his decision the bottom line is our diplomats have to get outside the w
are sure it is a city with a decline in property value and losing the home, it is not really tax evasion. why did they do it for five years? we have a political department that might be better at answering that. host: what was the housing market like in the 2007? make a comparison of what was going on in 2007 and what is happening now. guest: it was beginning to tank. values peaked around 2006 and in some places 2007. it is the year we began to see the foreclosures and the problems with a sub prime mortgages. the context was, we were not in a recession yet. it was not like 2007 -- 2008 when everyone had a problem. in 2007 it was clear there were going to be a lot of defaults and this was potentially a problem. this tool can be an efficient way of handling what would otherwise be expensive foreclosures. host: we want to make sure the viewers understand what we are talking about with regard to eligible homeowners who can use the mortgage debt relief act of 2007. the bank waives the portion of the balance they did not recoup in foreclosure, this goes into effect. the numbers are there on th
professionals. joseph, good morning. caller: good morning. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a certified guidance counselor. if i could give my personal testimony. i studied at hunter college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. that master's degree at that time required only 30 credits, graduate credits. i was in the last class that was certified at 30 credits. after that it became 48 and now it is 60. we had counted professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to just be listening, have disturbed children referred to us. we had enough training that we could try to help them. we could refer them. we had psychiatrist in new york available. as anw working in florida adjunct professor at the college level. my feeling is, the community college level and maybe colleges in general, i do not feel the counseling staff feels more or less the responsibility to really help these disturbed students. they would just as soon see them leave or dismissed. guest: let's look back to the virginia tech shooting, to the deadliest shooting to date. st
city. that is wall street. there is an economy based on military bases and nafta and oil. that is clear channel radio. time warner comes out georgia. up on the east coast, new york city is for the bankers are and insurance companies and derivatives and the jews that run the media. host: i will stop you on that point. this is from jan. some of you sharing your thoughts on our facebook page as well. one person writes -- host: join us honor twitter page or on our facebook page. rick from charlotte, north carolina. caller: good morning, america and steve. this is a great time to be an american. i think we are all looking forward to the new year. i am a loyal but nervous. -- i am a little bit nervous. mitch mcconnell is the key. he can take the president over into the presidency and a came a great man. we need to make sure we let mr. mcconnell know that history is there. i know he has a lot of issues. everyone bacchant e-mail, text -- everyone can e-mail and text and let mr. mcconnell n know. the tea party is off the rail. this will make this country take off. i hope mr. mcconnell sees this.
. they are still without power. in many parts of the city in the region, we're really pushing back the decades and it is hard to understand unless you have been there. i think the speaker is sensitive to that, the remarks are very positive that we need to address the needs of the people. i would hope that this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be insurmountable problems. this needs to be addressed immediately. >> the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this contact? are you there for us? when the storms hit last time p, the members came to us and said the devastation was so great, it changed the character of our community. the same thing can happen now unless we are there for the people. i agree with you that the speaker has been gracious and open with what i have heard has to honoring the social compact that we are there in times of natural disaster to remove doubt in people's mind that this will not be a political debate but a values debate. $700 billion for the tar funding. the chairman of the fed said that if i don't act immediately, we
city, albany, saturday and noon eastern on c-span 2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on cspan 3. up next, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined by former obama administers an adviser on iran to discusses the iranian nuclear program. and the foundation for the defense of democracies, this is one hour. >> good morning, it is a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. i want to quickly set the stage -- i don't need to tell anyone in this room about the death of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special reperteur on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and
an office and his city goes a long way. -- and authenticity goes a long way. this message of conservatism will reach the end of this nation in a positive way. i look forward to having an opportunity to think of a message as a have been. >> [no microphone] >> remember this humble moment. >[laughter] >> what does this mean for you personally? >> 18 years ago the citizens of charleston county give me an opportunity to represent them based on values and issues. a couple years later the folks in the state house seats in an opportunity to represent their issues and values. a few years ago they give me an opportunity to represent their issues in value. i'm not ever really heard, besides the fact or because you are black, here's what we want to do. it is about values and issues. it speaks to the issue of south carolina and our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people of our nation and state. more importantly than the complexion i have, that it is more important bring up in a single household. it did not give up on your kids. it may be tough. it all may be challenging. all things may be t
today. should washington compromise or go over the cliff? joining us from bay city, michigan, democratic line. caller: i am calling in in reference to this. i think that we paid today. into social security for 40 years. they should not touch that. they should leave medicare alone. i would like to have a list of all the people that want these pork barrel things in. the names and states of the people who want this. we voted them in and they should be working for the people and not the party. >> where is your frustration level with regards to congress and the president? caller: the president should get off of his high horse and just renew the tax cuts and go on and cut these pork barrel things. one guy wants this from this state, one guy wants that from that state, i am tired of hearing this. >> we have gathered all of the information on our website. on our homepage we will continue to monitor what happens in the house and senate as lawmakers continued to move closer to the tax issue, something we talked about this morning on "washington journal." host: maya macguineas is heading up the fix
-74. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome back to our table congressman tom cole, republican of oklahoma. let began with the news. john boehner send a proposal to the white house yesterday. what do you think? guest: it is a great opening start and makes it very tangible what the speaker committed to after the election. which is we are going to put revenue on the table. that is an enormous step forward by the republicans. not something we want to do but something we recognize we have to do to get there. i think the proposal to rex us toward where the real problems are which is entitlement spending. we cannot solve this with just revenue. while we like the paul ryan budget, the speaker basically picked up elements of some of the proposal from erskine bowles in an effort to try to reach forward. i think the speaker should be given a lot of credit for a great opening position. host: so, loopholes and deductions tha
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
city, saturday at noon eastern. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy and with the greatest threat to economic -- says the greatest threat to economic security is dependent on foreign oil. they are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production and improving conservation, to reduce revenue and decrease our debt. >> good evening. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's and leaders of our time i want to give of thanks to the staff. we stand on their shoulders and the hard work and time they spent with the leadership council, the policies staff to put these events together, our public local staff we did our political staff and the rest. we are seeing more production than we have seen before. the last couple decades of year on year growth. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons, yet we continue to have a problem. i think the report we are , its subtitley compan says it all, are missing american resources. how do we leverage the abundance we have in the united states to our maximu
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